Wednesday, January 25, 2012

tuesday

I found this first thing this morning.  She drew it a couple of days ago, she said.  I love it so.


making food for the pups.


Kitty Heaven in the livingroom.  (Condos, toys, climbing things, batting things... she likes to create things)

Magic School Bus (surprise!!)

downstairs for Mama (hup-two exercises--still loving that...)

Do you ever wonder where Trevy is in our pictures?
Here's a fine (and utterly usual) example of his life:

"Whatcha been researchin' today, Bub?"
"Mostly dinosuars.  Did you know there is a dinosaur called the Elvis dinosaur?"
"Really?"
"Yeah.  It lived in the Campanian stage."
"The Campanian stage!?  I've never heard of that."  (And I figure I'm pretty knowledgeable, as I live with him.)
"Yeah.  It's a period at the end of the Cretaceous.  Followed the Santonian.  Was a diverse time filled the first flowering plants, as well as frogs, salamanders, lizards, and birds."
"Oh!  We should fill these time periods in on our timeline.  And the Elvis dinosaur lived here?"
"Yeah.  It's called Brachylophosaurus.  Its remains were found in 2000(ce), and it was literally mummefied.  It was a spectacular find in Montana, with skin imprints tissue, and even the last meal the animal ate."
"Wow."
"I have a picture of one in one of my books..."  (We have several prehistory encyclopedias.)
[He looks for it in a book--knowing exactly which one it's in, of course, and his Mama catches up here, writing all this down.]


"Are you caught up, yet?" he asks.
"Yeah."  Smiles.  "Now... where were we?"


"The Brachylophosaurus.  The dinosaurs also documented in the same feeding grounds in the Campanian stage -in Alberta- included the the tyrannosaur Daspletosaurus, which was a small relative of Tyrannosaurus Rex, and the other hadrosaurs;  which included Parasaurolophus and Hypacrosaurus.  Also [here were] horned dinosuars, which include Centrosaurus and Styracosaurus, and the oviraptid Chirostenotes.  Also included, the giant crocodile Deinosuchus, two kinds of dromaeosaur, one called Saurornitholestes, and Bambiraptor.  And last but not least, the giant of the pterosaur family, Quetzalcoatlus Now, ...." and so goes the lecture.
Mmhmm, I'm absolutely crazy about him.


So we tended to the timeline.
Trev is bemoaning the fact that we have so few creatures on it--really gotta get the printer fixed.



An' there was mucho rasslin' on the stairs for a while.
Because... you know.  We were there.



An' there was Out.





And then... just them.  Into the big, wide world.

And let me just tell you.... that took a reeeeeeeeallly long time.
I'm not sure who was whimpering more.... Annabelle, or me.  Rrrr.
But you know.  Gotta make those babies happy.  Even if it's without me.  Her.  Us.

And so.
How'd that turn out, you ask?
Well. Ahem.
Too much whimpering.  Hers or mine, doesna matter.  Took its toll.
"Five minutes, Annie.  Five minutes, and we go and get them."
That lasted for a few seconds.
'Til I pictured Maddie walking across the ice or bank of the duck pond, and [then quick progression, because, as I've mentioned, this is the way my mind works...] Trevy trying to fish her out while hypothermia sets in.
"C'mon, babe.  Let's go get the babies."
So we loaded up into the truck, and went searchin'.
Up the hill, around the corner, and into the condos and to all the various duck ponds thereabouts.  There are like six or something.
huh uh.
To home, then.
Pull in, and see Trev in the livingroom window.
"Dude.  Too long.  You were gone too long.  That was over an hour."
Maddie cries.  Her mama scoops her up, and holds her tight.
"We went up there," she wails, "and for a walk, and then over there, and to over there, and then there were street lights, and I was cold and tired, and we were lost!!!"  Poor wee one.
"Dude.  Not cool."
"I know...I'm so sorry!.... I didn't mean for that to happen...." and so it was. 
"Here's the thing... I was cool with you wanting to go and have an adventure without me... that's fine with me!  I totally get Kid Freedom!  But you said to me 'up to the top of the hill', and you were not at the top of the hill, and I waited and waited and waited and waited... and then you were so far away that Maddie was uncomfortable... not cool, Bud.  Gotta watch out for her, and take these things into account."
"I know.. I'm so sorry.  I'll never do it again without bikes or a car or a skateboard..."
"No, dude."  I tend to say 'dude' when I"m perturbed, "Not good enough.  Going too far away on bikes isn't cool, either."     God help me. Much larger radius, then.  "Gotta just let me know where you're going.  And stick to it.  Just let me know!  It will help when we have another set of walky-talkies, and we'll do that immediately.  But in the meantime, you gotta do what you say you're going to do.  Just let me know... that's all I ask."
"I'm so sorry, Mom," he says, while Maddie still clings to her mama.
"I know, Babe.  Everything is alright, now.  Here.  Get these warm jammies back on, Madd (she had had a bath right before adventuring), and I'll get dinner on.  Wanna get tucked into the couch with this warm blanket and Magic School Bus, while I start supper?  Getting tucked in will make you feel safe and warm.  It's alright, darling.  All is well."

And yes... All is well.
Enchiladas in the works while one learns about physics, and the other watches yet another dinosaur documentary.

And it's true, lest you wonder, that all really is well.
Life takes on lots of wherefores and heretofores  and even thoughs... an' I adamantly still say, that indeed, it is... a sweet, sweet life.
And thank God I don't have to send them away every day!  :)
I like them too much to be able to stand it.

Roller skating.  While talking a-million-miles-an-hour. 
Mmhmm, she's recovered.


And skating and turning around -sans hands- in the kitchen.
She's getting tricky!

I do love this life.

12 comments:

  1. I love the dino lecture. :) You are blessed to have your own professor. ;)

    What an adventure you all had today!

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  2. wow. that must have been just wow. scary. personally (not that you care what i think. lol) you handle that so well. i think i might have lost my mind.

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  3. I wasn't frightened. I was anxious, there in the end, but not frightened.
    I knew that Trev wouldn't cross any busy streets, or go very far. They just took too long! :)

    It's important to me for my children to have a healthy sense of independence or individuality, since they are never away form me. Once in a while they go to play at a friend's home, but even that isn't very often; usually I am there. So they need time away to do their thing without me making judgments or offering my opinion about everything.
    It makes them feel strong and capable, to be big enough to be in the world without me for a few minutes.
    sigh.

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  4. "It's important to me for my children to have a healthy sense of independence or individuality, since they are never away form me."

    I'm thinking on this a lot lately. Benjamin is NEVER far from me. He's never taken a class/workshop without me--like a "drop him off and leave him there and come back later" type.

    This weekend he visited a family member's house. Two Christmases ago that family member's son was alone w/ Ben in the basement and he decided to bully him (held him by the wrists and challenged him to break free). I promised Ben I would not leave him alone w/ that boy again (the boy is 13)...well, my cousin took Benjamin downstairs and let him play with the bully's Legos (while the bully was away). At some point the bully's teenage sister & her friends converged on the basement (a total of seven 17 year olds) and it scared Ben to death! My cousin and my aunt seemed to think this is because he is not around many other children?!?! Instead, it's because he initially thought the bully was coming and in reality it was actually seven teenagers who formed a gauntlet along the stairs to the basement and Benjamin could not pass (he was frozen w/ fear).

    Anyway...this isn't the same, it's just a story to explain why I'm thinking on this issue. :(

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  5. "I knew that Trev wouldn't cross any busy streets, or go very far. They just took too long! :)"

    OF course...I forgot to mention (in my long comment)...you've raised a kind, capable spirit, indeed!

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  6. Maddie doesn't go out by herself. Our front yard is fenced, and she can play there as she will, but does not go outside the fence.
    If we lived in a circle or something, I wouldn't mind her riding her bike out around front, but we live a through-street that though is quiet, still gets cars, as it's a neighborhood=access street.

    So she only goes out with Trev... who is ten, of course, and has only been going out these past few months.

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  7. Eric spent his childhood in orchards - mostly alone, or with his dog - hunting lizards and fishing and watching wildlife... I spent my childhood on my bike or out gallivanting.
    Mine don't have neighborhood orchards or woods in the immediate vicinity, and since they don't have a life independent of me, I think it's important for them to have head=space without me in it.
    (The same thing here; no classes or workshops for them, though Maddie did have Girl Scouts last year. I forgot about that.)

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  8. Such a strong mama. It is true they need that freedom. Of course, today when we were out Eamon lost us. I was really worried. We were at the local botanical garden. I knew in my head that he is 8.5yrs old and knows what to do. After yelling his name and checking all the bathrooms, I encountered a ranger as we approached the entrance. Yep, he knew to go to the admission area and ask for help. My heart finally stopped racing know ing he was back with me. I was so happy to have found him, but that was almost overshadowed by how proud I was that he knew what to do.

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  9. some friends and i have talked about this... how in books the kids have to have the adult away (IE Harry Potter) to have the full on adventure and figure out life. i think as a HS mom it can be hard because you are there all the time. i struggle with this with my younger kids. maybe i need to let them wander a bit. i was out and about a lot as a kid and so was my husband. i

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  10. Your kids are awesome and so are you from what I have read. Love how you fill your days. Wish I didn't have to send mine away every day, HE just wasn't going to work out for us in the end so weekends are precious and I love it when they show interest in things they wanna learn with me. Blessings X

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  11. I'm sure you've read, Last Child in the Woods (do, if you haven't!). But, I think about the whole, unfettered outside time thing a lot after reading it. It's such a delicate balance - the freedom vs. safety thing. My son is only 4, so we'll see when we get there. He is taking a music class away from me right now and loves it (although it's only 45 minutes and there I am on the other side of the glass).

    Now - your timeline!? Do you have a whole room devoted to it? I love it. My mind is whirring. How can I emulate it? Do you have any more pictures in other posts? =)

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  12. Hi Kelly.
    Most of our living space is on one level, but in our basement we have a hall and two rooms--my room (personal space for me for my books, herbs and oils) and the rumpus room.
    The timeline goes down the stairs, down the hall, around a corner to the playroom, back up that hall to the other room, around the corner, and then back up the main part of the hall and back up the stairs. :)
    It starts at the top of the stairs, with the big bang.
    I think it's... 60-70 feet? Maybe?
    It's really hard to photograph, but there are a few:
    here
    here
    here.
    I love it, by the way. :) Makes me happy.

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Thanks so much for sharing your thoughts!